Why can't this derived object access the base class' post-decrement method?

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class Player
{
private:
    int score;
public:
    Player(int number);
    ~Player();
    int get_score() { return score; }
    Player& operator--();
};

Player::Player(int number)
{
score = number;
}


Player::~Player()
{
}


//-----
//Please turn your attention to this function
//-----

Player& Player::operator--() {
    score--;
    return *this;
}

Hello all, in the above class, I have overloaded the post-decrement operator to decrease the 'score'. There are two sub classes derived from this class - Computer and Human. From my understanding, they should also have access to this function. However, when I try:

Computer comp_; Human player_;

comp--;
human--;

I get an error saying: 'neither of these classes define this operator or a conversion to a type accessible to the predefined operator'. I am not allowed to redefine this function within the sub classes.

It would really help if someone could help me figure out how to get this code working! <3

You're trying to use the post-decrement operator, but you've declared the pre-decrement operator!

To make this code work, either use pre-decrement comp--; => --comp;. Or switch to defining the post-decrement operator Player& operator--(); => Player& operator--(int);. See a working example here: ideone.

For more on what each decrement/increment operator looks like, see the cppreference page.

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The post decrement operator should look like this:

T T::operator--(int);    // Inside class definition
T operator++(T& a, int); // Outside class definition

and it's supposed to return a copy of the object like it looked before you decreased its value.

class Player
{
private:
    int score;
public:
    Player(int number);
    virtual ~Player();
    int get_score() { return score; }

    template<typename T>
    friend T& operator--(T& p) { // pre
        --p.score;
        return p;
    }

};

Player::Player(int number) : score(number) {}
Player::~Player() {}

template<typename T>
T operator--(T& p, int) {        // post
    T save(p);
    --p;                         // using pre
    return save;
}

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The problem comes from the fact that you only define pre-increment operator.

see https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/operator_incdec

The pre-increment returns a reference, however the post increment returns a value therefore if you need to retain the type of the object returned. I would define the post-increment as a template and use the implementation of the pre-increment.

namespace Game
{
    class Player
    {
    private:
        int score;
    public:
        Player(int number);
        ~Player();
        int get_score() { return score; }
        Player& operator--();
    };
    Player::Player(int number)
    {
        score = number;
    }
    Player::~Player()
    {
    }
    Player& Player::operator--() {
        score--;
        return *this;
    }
    template <class T> T operator--(const T& a, int)
    {
        T save(a);
        save--;
        return save;
    }

    class Human : public Player
    {
    public:
        Human(int player) :Player(player) {}
    };

    class Computer : public Player
    {
    public:
        Computer(int player) :Player(player) {}
    };
}

example

int main()
{
    Game::Human h(2);
    Game::Human h2 = h--;
}

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Comments
  • I guess human and computer inherit from Player?; can we see how?
  • Please include a main() function and provide a Compilable, Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable Example. This helps us help you.